DEAD WOOD

Dead wood is of fundamental importance for the ecosystem of the woods, representing an irreplaceable source of biodiversity, as it generates life and continuity between animal and plant species. Hundreds of saproxylic insect larvae, which as adults will be essential for pollination, live on dead wood and are important for the vitality of the forest. Deadwood is the favorite feast of bark beetles, but also of many other types of insects and birds, amphibians, reptiles and rodents, digging nests and finding shelter. The rotting process lasts about 10-30 years. Unfortunately, the uncontrolled deforestation by man has caused serious damage, and the closed physical system and the continuous withdrawal of wood mass has caused enormous consequences and catastrophes in the forests. The quality of the forest is determined by the quantity of rotting wood mass present, which must be abundant, which has now become rare in European forests.